The Great Depression Brought Popcorn To The Movies

October 8, 2013, 5:30 a.m. The numbers said “Kick-Ass 2″ was going to do just that. Before its theatrical release, audience tracking surveys estimated the superhero action-comedy could gross as much as $25 million its opening weekend. Instead, the sequel took in only $13 million, finishing far behind the civil rights drama ” Lee Daniels ‘ The Butler” and earning “Kick-Ass 2” an instant reputation as a flop. For decades, tracking was used by studios to determine filmgoer interest ahead of a new movie’s release and tell marketing executives where to spend their ad dollars. But now trade publications, national dailies, blogs, TV newscasts and even drive-time radio shows share the once closely held numbers with everyday moviegoers. Tracking establishes financial expectations for a new film as well as an A-list star’s ability to “open” a movie. The estimates effectively declare a winner before the weekly box-office battle begins. PHOTOS: Costliest box office flops But at a time when tracking’s influence on a film’s box-office fate has never been greater, chronic inaccuracies have led industry observers and some studio chiefs to conclude that tracking may no longer be a dependable box-office barometer. With a cluster of Oscar-worthy films soon heading into theaters, the pre-release surveys are increasingly coming under attack. “Tracking is broken. There’s no doubt about it,” said Vincent Bruzzese, chief executive of the tracking firm Worldwide Motion Picture Group. “It’s been asking the same questions since 1980.

Chloe Moretz, Julianne Moore, ‘Carrie’ cast talk horror movies

As popcorn re-entered the home, traditional associations of popcorn and movies, or popcorn and entertainment, persisted. Nordmende, a German electronics company, even used popcorn to advertise its microwave, purporting it to be a sponsor of the midweek movie . Nowadays, the popcorn industry attaches itself to our home movie nights in a very direct way, through commercials that directly engage with popular films or movie theater styles of microwave popcorn that market themselves as a direct replica of the beloved theater snack. But the relationship between popcorn and the movies has changed more than the smell of a theater lobby or the at-home movie night: its changed the popcorn industry itself. Before the Great Depression, most popcorn sold was a white corn varietyyellow corn wasnt widely commercially grown, and cost twice as much as the white variety. Movie vendors, however, preferred yellow corn , which expanded more when it popped (creating more volume for less product) and had a yellowish tint that belied a coating of butter. People became accustomed to the yellow popcorn and would refuse to buy the white variety at markets, requesting the kind that looked like the popcorn at the movies . Today, white popcorn accounts for 10 percent of commercially grown popcorn; yellow popcorn takes up almost the rest of the commercial market (with some color varieties, like blue and black, grown in negligible amounts). Popcorn is just as economically important to the modern movie theater as it was to movie theaters of old. Patrons often complain about the high prices of movie concessions, but theres an economic basis for this: popcorn, cheap to make and easy to mark-up, is the primary profit maker for movie theaters. Movie theaters make an estimated 85 percent profit off of concession sales, and those sales constitute 46 percent of movie theaters overall profits. And so the history of popcorn and the movies was written in stonesort of. In recentyears, luxury theaters have begun popping up around the countryand theyre reinventing the popcorn-snack model.

The 5 Best Halloween-Themed Horror Movies

5. Satan’s Little Helper (2004) At the five-spot is a fun little horror outing directed by Jeff Lieberman, which tells the story of a young boy who, on Halloween night, is unknowingly assisting a serial killer commit a string of murders. You’ll laugh, you’ll cringe…you’ll have a good time. 4. Sleepy Hollow (1999) Based, or loosely based, on the story “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving, ‘Sleepy Hollow’ tells the tale of constable Ichabod Crane (played wonderfully by Johnny Depp) who is sent to the quiet town to investigate the decapitations of three people when he is ultimately confronted by the legendary Headless Horseman. Oh, yeah, and it’s directed by Tim Burton. See it. 3. Dark Night of the Scarecrow (1981) At number three, ‘Dark Night of the Scarecrow’ is actually a deeply-disturbing-but-wonderfully-fantastic voyage into true terror. A mentally challenged man is wrongfully accused of murder and returns as a scarecrow to seek revenge; the scarecrow’s only ally/friend: a small girl. Creepy, eerie, all of those words that describe that same icky feeling. 2. Halloween (1978) Yes, I ranked the immortal classic ‘Halloween’ number 2. Don’t get me wrong; it is, in my mind, of the greatest films ever made, period. But this is a list of best Halloween-themed movies.

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Its basically a rite of passage being self-aware enough to know that what youre watching is beyond your years, but suffering through it anyway. Why do you think we include it in our Pop Culture Personality Tests ? Related ‘Carrie’ marketing stunt goes viral: What if telekinesis were real? VIDEO At the Los Angeles premiere of Carrie, director Kimberly Peirces re-imagining of Stephen Kings 1974 horror classic (and Brian De Palmas 1976 film), stars Chloe Moretz, Julianne Moore, and Judy Greer recounted their own tales of the movies that traumatized them in their youth. Julianne Moore, who plays the part of Carrie Whites religious zealot mother, recalled an image that haunted her for years. I did see a James Bond movie with my parents when I was really, really little and a woman was poisoned in it, so I was always afraid that poison was going to drip down from the ceiling. I thought it would go in my mouth and Id be poisoned, the four-time Oscar nominee said of 1967s You Only Live Twice. For director Kimberly Peirce, it was William Friedkins The Exorcist. I was way too young, she laughed.While I was watching it someone in my family in the pitch black when her head was spinning around, somebody reached down and grabbed my leg and yanked me up, and I dont think Ive recovered, she said. I was too young. It was too awful.