Pink Wasn’t Always Girly

New strain leaves pink-eye for nearly month

They could well have a future too. This can be more than a cute little story for us to consider. In our desperation to find a way out of our present national dilemma, we might “tek lesson” and really settle down to some productive marketing strategies to move us forward. We talk endlessly about “marketing Brand Jamaica”, but what exactly are we selling? For a start, nobody wants to buy our gloomy vision of ourselves. We’re not even bothering to take care of what we have. We boast about our Reggae, but how much do we get from it? For the second year, Japanese have come from Japan to win the World Reggae Dance Competition, pushing us off the stage. We took it for granted that we would win, but we lost. From what I saw, we weren’t so hot. So a dance contest is no big thing, but wouldn’t it have been great if we showed the world what we can do with what we make? A reggae/dance contest won’t pay down the national debt, but if we really showed proficiency in what is supposed to be ours, it could stir us to greater endeavour, don’t it? The Job Fear Some teachers who went to the Ministry of Education Job Fair earlier this week really expected that they would just go in and come out with a job? When you go to a health fair, do you come out healed same time? If some of the responses of persons who attended and left disappointed is par for the course, then we’re in serious trouble. What was evident from the interviews broadcast on radio is some of the persons who went job-hunting could not communicate effectively. What was also disturbing was the entitlement attitude that some job seekers portrayed. It was obvious that they were not interested in the long haul which comes with the challenge in a time of scarcity. We are still not over the experience of the experiment to get jobs for teachers in the New York area in 2011 or thereabouts.

Pink Heals tour stopping in W. Mich.

Peg McNichol/Sentinel Staff Events Calendar Posted Aug 16, 2013 @ 11:00 AM Last update Aug 16, 2013 @ 06:03 PM Related Stories It’s True: You’re Paying Much More for Rent Next Year Zeeland A fleet of pink-swathed public safety vehicles with volunteers at the wheel will roll into Michigan on Sunday, destined for an overnight stay in this area. For months, dozens of West Michigan residents who work as firefighters and police officers have dedicated countless hours to promoting the tour. The point of the tour is to show support to women which is why the color pink is being used. Though pink is often identified as the color for breast cancer patients, this tour is open to anyone battling cancer, according to organizers. As part of the national tour, area firefighters and police officers have been raising awareness of the tour while raising money that will stay in the community and be used to help people with cancer. On Sunday morning, a caravan of motorcyclists will head south to meet the six pink fire trucks and one pink police squad car at Michigan’s border, escorting the visitors first to Allegan, for a picnic at Jaycee Park, 200 Monroe Ave., so people affected by cancer can add their names to hundreds of cancer patients’ signatures on the fleet. The tour visits Ottawa County on Monday, with stops at Elhart Automotive Campus, which loaned a Kia to the West Michigan effort. Zeeland City Council agreed to skip a study session and meet 90 minutes earlier, at 5:30 p.m. Monday, so city officials can participate in the tour’s Zeeland stop, which will include a 5-minute challenge course, Joes versus Pros and a parade. Fundraisers held by Pink Heals West Michigan from Allegan to Raveanna will help pay for respite time at Camp Geneva for people with cancer and their care partner. Learn more at pinktrucks.org, pinkhealswestmi.com or facebook.com/pinkhealsmi.com . Follow this reporter on Facebook and Twitter, @SentinelPeg. A fleet of pink-swathed public safety vehicles with volunteers at the wheel will roll into Michigan on Sunday, destined for an overnight stay in this area. For months, dozens of West Michigan residents who work as firefighters and police officers have dedicated countless hours to promoting the tour. The point of the tour is to show support to women which is why the color pink is being used. Though pink is often identified as the color for breast cancer patients, this tour is open to anyone battling cancer, according to organizers. As part of the national tour, area firefighters and police officers have been raising awareness of the tour while raising money that will stay in the community and be used to help people with cancer. On Sunday morning, a caravan of motorcyclists will head south to meet the six pink fire trucks and one pink police squad car at Michigan’s border, escorting the visitors first to Allegan, for a picnic at Jaycee Park, 200 Monroe Ave., so people affected by cancer can add their names to hundreds of cancer patients’ signatures on the fleet. The tour visits Ottawa County on Monday, with stops at Elhart Automotive Campus, which loaned a Kia to the West Michigan effort. Zeeland City Council agreed to skip a study session and meet 90 minutes earlier, at 5:30 p.m. Monday, so city officials can participate in the tour’s Zeeland stop, which will include a 5-minute challenge course, Joes versus Pros and a parade.

Network 18 hands out pink slips to 325 employees

By Rayyan Al-Shawaf Pink Sari Revolution: A Tale of Women and Power in India A book by Amana Fontanella-Khan The women gracing the cover of Pink Sari Revolution: A Tale of Women and Power in India, by Amana Fontanella-Khan, arent trying to make a fashion statement with their matching pink attire. Look closely; youll see expressions of anger, if not rage, on their faces. And the laathislong sticks made of canethat many of them wield? Theyre not for walking. The women in the picture, and many more besides, constitute the Gulabi Gang, a grass-roots movement in Bundelkhand, a region in Indias northern state of Uttar Pradesh. The Gulabi Gang hounds Indian officialdom into securing the rights of the poor and the marginalized, especially women. They chose pink saris (the wraparound garment worn by Indian women of all socioeconomic classes) for the simple reason that most other colors represent political or religious groups. We didnt want people to mistake us for someone else, explains Sampat Pal Devi, founder and leader of the Pink Gang (Gulabi is Hindi for pink). To see long excerpts from Pink Sari Revolution at Google Books, click here . Pink Sari Revolution revolves around Sampat, a headstrong woman in her early 50s whose crusade against injustice Fontanella-Khan treats with insight and empathy in this alternately rousing and sobering bookher first. The Pakistani-Irish author, who recently relocated to Belgium after living in India for several years, is understandably impressed with her subject, and highlights one Pink Gang achievement after another in the groups quest to expose and shame Indian officials and police for their massive corruption and incessant violations of lower-caste peoples rights. Though legally abolished, the Hindu caste system in India remains a strong cultural and even political force. But Fontanella-Khans self-effacing approach sometimes makes the book a platform for Sampat, rather than an outside observers account of her struggle. Indeed, though related in the third person, Pink Sari Revolution recounts much of the Pink Gangs history from Sampats point of view, and overlaps in places with Sampat Pal: Warrior in a Pink Sari, the Pink Gang leaders autobiography as told to writer Anne Berthod. (That book was originally published in French in 2008 and is not widely available in English translation, as the latter edition came out only in India four years later.) For most of the events in Sampats life that Fontanella-Khan revisits, she seems to have consulted only the Gangs charismatic head. And although Sampat has earned a reputation for honesty and incorruptibility, qualifying her as a dependable source of information, readers may sometimes feel confined to only one version of fraught and even divisive debates and events.

So So Gayfirst encountered Pink Iceland Your LGBT travel expert in Iceland back in December 2012. When we visited Reykjavik for New Year, we were keen to catch up with the companys founders to find out about the motivation, purpose and aims of this fledgling enterprise were. Apart from being absolutely delightful on a personal level, we found Eva Maria and Hannes to be extremely passionate about what they are hoping to achieve with Pink Iceland. Therefore, it made sense to us to see for ourselves how this passion translates into reality. We decided to book places on Pink Icelands tour of the Snfellsnes Peninsula. We were told in advance that accompanying us on the trip would be our guide, Kristin and two American tourists, Chuck and Craig. Kristin greeted us with a huge smile and a polite handshake before inviting us to get into the 44. Naturally, a concern when you are a member of a small party such as this is that conversation will be awkward and/or short-lived. This fear proved to be unfounded as our guide immediately engaged all of us in conversation in an effort to get to know us. This would be essential given that we wouldnt return to our starting point in Reykjavik until 12 hours later. What struck us was Kristins readiness to share her personal perspective on the stunning vistas we encountered on our trip. Valleys and mountains that may well have passed us by became the backdrop for folktales from Kristins childhood, which she recounted with incredible lucidity and clarity. Stories of elves, trolls and giants were combined with anecdotes from Kristins own family history; tales of her grandfather having to fish through mouldy vats of stagnant water to find the meat the family had stored in the days before electricity reached the shores of Iceland. The bay at Arnarstapi Snfellsnes Peninsula is situated to the north of Reykjavik and to the south of the West Fjords. At the end of the peninsula is Snfellsjokull, a 700,000-year-old stratovolcano topped by a glacier. This was the site where the protagonists in Jules VernesJourney To The Centre Of The Earthfound the passageway leading to the earths core. Our first stop was at Geruberg, at the eastern end of the peninsula. As we approached, our guide pointed out a long wall of vertical basalt columns on the horizon, just one of the very many scars left on the Icelandic landscape by volcanic activity.

Pink Floyd tribute band — including St. Charles man — to play at RiverEdge

It now tours around the country and it’s making a few stops right here in West Michigan this week. Ride captain Rick Smith and Ruth Smith spoke about the tour and their involvement. Pink Heals tour stopping in W. Mich. Related Stories LISA ROBIN KELLY OF “THAT 70S SHOW” DIES LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lisa Robin Kelly of “That 70s Show” has died. SNAKE IN THE LOCKER ROOM ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Bats, balls, gloves, uniforms — and a giant snake? Business News US builders broke ground on more homes in July WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. developers broke ground on new homes at a faster pace in July, partly reversing a sharp drop the previous month. The figures suggest that housing construction is maintaining its recovery. Eds: Makes minor changes throughout. With AP Photos. By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dropped 15,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 320,000, the fewest since October 2007 — a sign of dwindling layoffs and steady if modest job growth. … IN THE NEWS: NSA WENT OVERBOARD WITH SURVEILLANCE: REPORT WASHINGTON (AP) — We’re getting a new look at the scope of the National Security Agency surveillance program. Site Map Stay Connected: c 2013, WWMT-TV | Portions are Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or distributed.

A large number of people have been asked to leave. The section that has been hit the most in the process of retrenchment are cameramen and technicians. Many morning news anchors have also been asked to leave, said a source in the know. Rajdeep Sardesai, editor-in-chief IBN 18 network, late night, tweeted, Hurt and pain can be lonely. You must grieve in solitude. An employee in Mumbai, who was given the termination letter, said, We were called to the office and were simply handed the letters. Almost the entire crew at IBN7 has been asked to leave. Those of us who have not been given the termination letters are in terror of being handed one any moment. Executives in Independent Media Trust and from the human resources department from the network sat at the round table putting the termination letters in the respective envelopes and stamping them. It looked like a post office, the way they were stamping letters in the conference room. Another source added that journalists in CNBC TV18s Delhi bureau have been assured that their jobs are secure. We have, however, been told that the bureau will be left with almost no cameramen and technicians, as the newsroom for all channels will be integrated, said the source. The pink slips are principally at TV18 Broadcast, the subsidiary of the listed company Network 18. TV18 Broadcast operates CNBC-TV18, CNBC Awaaz, CNN-IBN, IBN7 and IBN Lokmat, among others. Together the channels employ about 2,000, including journalists, camera persons and production staff. Sources said that most retrenchment is happening at CNN IBN and at IBN7.

Broadway Ave., Aurora Tickets, $20-$60 riveredgeaurora.com Updated: August 15, 2013 5:24PM For Tom Quinn, the lead guitarist and band leader of the Pink Floyd tribute group The Pink Floyd Experience, the appeal of the original bands music is simple. I think Pink Floyds appeal is based on powerful, transcendent music and compositions, he said. The songs were brilliantly performed and recorded and they have truly stood the test of time. The Pink Floyd Experience will be presented on Aug. 17 at the RiverEdge Park in Aurora. The original Pink Floyd began in London, England, in the mid-1960s. The band has sold more than 200 million albums since 1967, and the group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. The Pink Floyd Experience stage show is performed live with six musicians and more than $2.5 million worth of production equipment on stage. The production features a massive light show, high-definition projections, quadraphonic sound and a 12-foot-long inflatable pig. The pig refers to Pink Floyds 10th studio album, Animals, which was released in 1977. The albums cover image features a pig floating between two chimneys. Quinn started performing in Pink Floyd tribute bands in 1994, and started The Pink Floyd Experience in 2003. Although Quinn and the other members of The Pink Floyd Experience do not imitate or look like most members of Pink Floyd, the essence of the original band is present. This show has given us unprecedented freedom to come up with the most comprehensive and eclectic set of Floyd classics weve ever put together: Hits & Rarities, said Quinn about the current show. Bold choices from albums The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, Meddle, A Saucerful of Secrets get mixed in with wildly anticipated favorites to come up with my dream sets. Some Pink Floyd hits that the band will perform include Money, Have A Cigar, Time, Comfortably Numb and Run Like Hell. The Pink Floyd Experience is based in San Diego, Calif., but performing in the Chicago area is a bit of a homecoming for Quinn. I went to high school in St. Charles, he said. My first band mates were in St. Charles. If the rumors are true, Quinn continued, I expect to see lots of familiar faces at the Aurora show from immediate family, old classmates and band members. Quinn does not take his success lightly and is pleased with the longevity of his Pink Floyd tribute career. I gain the most satisfaction from the sticking it out when everyone said it was over, because my heart said otherwise, he said.

Travel Review: Snæfellsnes Peninsula tour with Pink Iceland

Well, no trip is complete without at least one Instagram photo.

By the late19th century, however–and especially as Freud and other psychologists’ theories of childhood development gained hold–parents began to differentiate their offspring’s sex earlier on. As they did, some parents favored pink for girls and blue for boys, though Paoletti reports that wide variance continued for several more decades. Steele says the French exerted an early, if modest, influence on pink’s gender coding. Thus, as both she and Paoletti note, Louisa May Alcott’s 1880 classic Little Women credits the French when Amy distinguishes her sister’s newborn twins by giving the baby girl a pink ribbon, the baby boy blue. For several decades, however, pink defied consensus. Based on a review of museum collections and other sources, Paoletti found pink baby gifts and even the occasional garment for boys or “baby brother paper dolls” into the 1960s, though “[t]hese examples are all clearly out of the mainstream. By the 1950s, pink was strongly associated with femininity.” Steele told me this view of pink was mainly “for young girls. … It seems to be a kind of early gender coding that worked especially on young girls.” As she wrote in her 1985 book Fashion and Eroticism, “The decade of the Fifties was characterized by an ideological emphasis on conformity, and by fashion images that were sharply age- and gender-specific.” Thus Betty Friedan rails repeatedly in The Feminine Mystique about the setbacks women experienced in the 1950s, compared to their gains and relative freedom in the two decades before. Ironically, Paoletti thinks it was this very sort of feminist critique of mid-century gender roles that helped solidify the feminization of pink for girls and women. “Since the 1980s … pink [has] become a strongly feminine color (probably because the women’s movement connected it with traditional girliness so successfully).” As the turmoil of the 1960s gained strength, and young baby boomers began to question traditional gender roles, women embraced more “masculine” styles such as pants and short haircuts. For their part, men enjoyed the so-called Peacock Revolution, wearing their hair longer and more colorful garments.

The infection started to peak after the rains ceased, from the first week of August. With Goa experiencing episodes of rain followed by warm weather, the humid, erratic climate offers perfect breeding conditions for disease-causing germs, say ophthalmologists. “While we see sporadic conjunctivitis all through the year, it has been an outbreak of sorts in the past few weeks,” says Dr Sielda Gomes , consultant ophthalmologist at Apollo Victor Hospitals, Margao. Around 10% of the outpatients at any eye hospital are diagnosed with conjunctivitis, add doctors. “The conjunctivitis cases we are receiving this year are quite misleading. While conjunctivitis usually affects both eyes, some patients only suffer symptoms in one eye. They may also have fever and other flu symptoms along with a small swelling of the lymph nodes below the ears,” says Dr Chandrakanth Shetye , consultant at Maxivision Eye Hospital, Mapusa. “Another issue is that the pain, redness and irritation could persist for longer, even 15 days to a month, unlike the conventional conjunctivitis that clears up within 7 to 8 days,” he points out. On a daily basis, Shetye receives 10 to 12 patients with ‘pink-eye’ or ‘Madras-eye’ as conjunctivitis is commonly called. “Conjunctivitis may be a common viral infection, but the sufferer should consult the ophthalmologist at least once. Not all red-eye may be conjunctivitis and not all conjunctivitis can be treated with over-the-counter eye-drops,” stresses Dr Ulhas Kaisare, a Panaji-based ophthalmologist. “People usually approach their general practitioners for initial treatment and come to an eye specialist only if the symptoms persist, or if the infection becomes very severe,” he says. If not treated on time, one-third of patients with conjunctivitis can develop complications, where the virus can affect the cornea and cause vision problems and ulcers due to secondary bacterial infections. “Twenty to thirty per cent of patients with conjunctivitis during the rainy season develop viral kerato conjunctivitis, a virulent form of the disease that causes pain and blurred vision.