How Women Can Save The World By Telling Epic Stories In The Movies

The Great Depression brought popcorn to the movies

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Being a cosmopolitan today means that one takes a humanistic delight in the many cultures and forms of knowledge around the world. It does not mean that one doesn’t feel a sense of loyalty to one’s own country — simply that one has a strong interest in the rest of the world and in the common good of humanity. Nations and peoples flourish when they adopt cosmopolitan ideals. One thinks of Elizabethan England, Gupta India, Renaissance Florence, and Tang Dynasty China at the height of the Silk Road. These were eras when travel and trade linked together many fascinating cultures and peoples, and great art and innovation were the result. For women today, being cosmopolitan means being open to the world, to innovation, to new possibilities. It means not being held back by outmoded ideas of what a woman’s place should be, or what kinds of stories a woman should tell on the big screen. In keeping with this spirit, the audience at Social Media Week LA strongly agreed when I suggested that female filmmakers should not be confined to just romantic comedies and chamber dramas. We should have the opportunity to write and direct grand historical epics, ambitious sci-fi films, imaginative fantasy-adventures, huge comic book movies, sweeping literary adaptations, and much more. It’s by leading such big cinematic efforts that women can make their greatest mark in reshaping the culture. And this reshaping of culture is very much needed today. On a technical level we are more cosmopolitan than ever before, with our greater connectivity to everyone else on the planet (and even the galaxy, with Voyager 1 now leaving the solar system) — but our thinking is not equally broad-minded and cosmopolitan. Despite all our advances in digital communication, the peoples of the world are as riven as ever by conflicts between races, genders, religions, and cultures. I was tremendously proud a few weeks ago that America, a nation that I love for its revolutionary ideals of freedom and democracy, would welcome the first Miss America of Indian descent, Nina Davuluri.

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Eaters found the act of popping corn wildly entertaining , and by 1848, popcorn, the snack food, was prevalent enough to be included in theDictionary of Americanisms.Popcorn had literally exploded onto the scene and was available everywhereespecially at entertainment sites like circuses and fairs. In fact, there was really only one entertainment site where the snack was absent: the theaters. One reason for popcorns increasing popularity was its mobility: in 1885, the first steam-powered popcorn maker hit the streets, invented by Charles Cretor . The mobile nature of the machine made it the perfect production machine for serving patrons attending outdoor sporting events, or circuses and fairs. Not only was popcorn mobile, but it could be mass-produced without a kitchen, an advantage that another crunchy snackthe potato chiplacked (the earliest potato chips were made in small batches in kitchens, not ideal for mass snack appeal). Another reason for its dominance over other snacks was its appealing aroma when popped, something that street vendors used to their advantage when selling popcorn. Still, movie theaters wouldnt allow the popular street snack into their auditoriums. Movie theaters wanted nothing to do with popcorn, Smith says, because they were trying to duplicate whatwas done in real theaters. They had beautiful carpets and rugs and didnt want popcorn being ground into it. Movie theaters were trying to appeal to a highbrow clientele, and didnt want to deal with the distracting trash of concessionsor the distracting noise that snacking during a film would create. When films added sound in 1927, the movie theater industry opened itself up to a much wider clientele, since literacy was no longer required to attend films (the titles used early silent films restricted their audience). By 1930, attendance to movie theaters had reached 90 million per week. Such a huge patronage created larger possibilities for profitsespecially since the sound pictures now muffled snacksbut movie theater owners were still hesitant to bring snacks inside of their theaters. The Great Depressionpresented an excellent opportunity for both movies and popcorn. Looking for a cheap diversion, audiences flocked to the movies.

Now at Your Library: Streaming Movies, Music

It works similarly to Netflix: Through an app on a tablet or a browser on a personal computer, users can peruse dozens of movies and click on a film to “borrow” it. The content starts streaming, for free. While libraries are already loaning e-books, the move to streaming is part of a larger shift for them to remain relevant in a digital world. Libraries are “meeting patrons where they want to access content,” said Kirk Blankenship, Electronic Resources Librarian for Seattle Public Libraries, which is using the service called Hoopla. The service, from Ohio-based Midwest Tape, LLC, is also being used in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Topeka, Kan., and several others towns and cities nationwide. Hoopla launched in full in May with 20 library systems. As of early September, there are about 220,000 people using the app, said Michael Manon, Hoopla’s brand manager. The goal is to reach 100 library systems by year’s end. Libraries have always been a source of audiovisual entertainment. A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that among patrons 16 years old and older, 40 percent visited libraries to borrow movies. Another 16 percent borrowed music. In the Seattle area, DVDs and CDs of popular titles can have queues of hundreds of people waiting to check them out.